New job with the Seminole Channel!

Hey hey!

Lonnnnnng time no post!  But, I’m back(!) and excited to announce that I have moved down to South Florida to work as the Host and Multimedia Journalist for The Seminole Channel (which is owned and operated by the Seminole Tribe of Florida).  It was difficult to say goodbye to New York City, but the rest of Indian Country was calling.  (Not to worry, though…NYC has not seen the last of me!)

For those who are interested or have asked where they can watch The Seminole Channel, it currently airs on Directv and is only viewable by Seminole Tribal members living on one of the six STOF reservations.  But, there are plans to expand our audience and eventually share content with other Indigenous news networks soon.  I will be sure you let you know when and where you can view our content as our reach continues to grow.

We tape the show in front of a green screen because the set is virtual. I hosted this show solo because my co-host was reporting in another state.
We tape the show in front of a green screen because the set is virtual. I hosted this show solo while my co-host was reporting in another state.
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Just a little self-promotion 🙂

I moved to South Florida to work for Seminole Media Productions because I care about Indigenous people and telling Indigenous stories, and I am very excited to be a part of an incredible operation with passionate and dedicated media professionals.  I am excited about collaborating in an effort to make SMP an even more successful operation than it already is…The possibilities of what we can and will achieve are endless!

-NativeJournalist

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UNL’s new magazine aims to tell the untold stories of Native American women

A colleague of mine from the Tow Knight Center for Entrepreneurial Journalism just alerted me to a post on Ms. Magazine’s blog about a University of Nebraska-Lincoln College of Journalism and Mass Communications project.  The school has created a new magazine called Native Daughters along with a companion curriculum for educators.  I am so thrilled to learn about this new project!

According to their site, the magazine is made up of:

a collection of stories, profiles and multimedia projects about a diverse group of Native American women. They are healers and warriors, story tellers and law makers, leaders, environmentalists and artists. It is our intention that these stories are just a starting point to learn about Native American women and we hope women across the country will join in and share their voices.

The original purpose for creating the magazine stems from:

[the] belief that one cannot understand America without understanding Native Americans. One cannot understand Native America without understanding the historical, political and cultural role that Native American women have played and continue to play in indigenous life.

Native Daughters is a two-year project from the first meeting to the finished magazine and website, involving five University of Nebraska-Lincoln professors and about 30 students. The idea stemmed from several brainstorming sessions among professors looking for a new way to tell an older story about indigenous America.

The magazine is still looking for contributions.  If you would like to submit something, contact them here.

I hope to read some of your stories in the magazine and watch some of your videos on their website soon!

-NativeJournalist